VS1053 Troubleshooting

Last night, I looked into why Adafruit's VS1053 only works with Teensy 3.1 at 24 MHz, but not 48, 72 or 96 MHz.

Turns out, the library depends SD.begin() to reconfiguring SPI.  It also runs data transfer code from both main program & interrupt context (causing havoc if the interrupt occurs at the wrong moment).  Pretty amazing it's worked on AVR for so long, but apparently it does crash sometimes.  Faster processors increase the opportunity for the problem to strike.

Hopefully my edits from last night will fix these problems for good.

Christmas lights notes

PySerial will tell you that the following baud rates are supported:
(50, 75, 110, 134, 150, 200, 300, 600, 1200, 1800, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200, 38400, 57600, 115200, 230400, 460800, 500000, 576000, 921600, 1000000, 1152000, 1500000, 2000000, 2500000, 3000000, 3500000, 4000000)

Improving Arduino's Serial Monitor Performance

Today I worked on the toughest Arduino bug... keeping the serial monitor from locking up or crashing with maximum speed printing from Teensy 3.1 and Arduino Due.

Here's Technical details and mini rant about Java performance.  Hopefully this (and other good work) will lead to future Arduino versions with a serial monitor that doesn't suck.

Strain Relief

I've struggled with appropriate wire-to-board connections over the years.
 

Six Years of USB Development

Six years ago, in early Deceber 2008, I left the simple world of serial-based development behind and went native USB, releasing Teensy 1.0.  So much has happened and I've learned a lot in just 6 years.  I used to do everything by 9 pin RS-232 serial ports.  Those days seem so distant.

I'm now working on new and really awesome USB features for 2015...

Better SPI Bus Design in 3 Steps

Most Arduino SPI tutorials show this simple but poor SPI bus design:

A much better SPI bus design can prevent conflicts.  3 simple improvements are needed:

  1. Use pullup resistors on all chip select signals.

  2. Verify tri-state behavior on MISO: use a tri-state buffer chip if necessary.

  3. Protect bus access with SPI.beginTransaction(settings) and SPI.endTransaction().

Click "Read more" for details on these 3 steps.

Making nRF8001 (Bluetooth LE) and SD cards play nice together

Been working on making Adafruit_nRF8001 and the SD library work together.  Details are on this forum thread, and also this one.

This is how we disappear - projection notes

I’ve been meaning to document my work on this project for about year now. TBA 2014 reminded me it is time to actually do it! So here it is:

For the past year and a half I’ve been working with a dance company called bobbevy. I’ve been creating graphics that go along with the dance performance called “This is how we disappear”. Here’s a review at Portland Monthly.

 

This is how we disappear - projection edit from Brian Richardson on Vimeo.

 

More behind the scenes information after the break!

Windows 10 Preview Build 9860 *finally* fixes USB Serial

I am happy to report Windows 10 Preview build 9860 fixes the long-standing USB serial bugs, which impact nearly all Arduino compatible boards.

  • The driver loads automatically.  No 3rd party INF is required.
  • The surprise removal bug is finally fixed (was present in build 9841, is fixed in 9860)
  • The seconds-long pause when detecting a new USB device for the very first time appears to be gone.

Windows 10 is finally going to support all class-compliant USB serial (eg, CDC-ACM) as well as Linux and Mac OS-X.  Very exciting.

CHURCH OF ROBOTRON

The Church of Robotron is coming to Portland, OR. We will be open the Last Wednesday of September (the 24th) and the First Thursday of October (the 2nd) starting at 7pm both nights at the Diode Gallery (514 NW Couch St) which is across the street from Ground Kontrol. We'll have multiple versions of Robotron 2084 available to train with and we will be triggering physical events in response to game events. One example: lasers when lasers are shot in game. For info about how this is accomplished, check out this older post.

Right now, we have an installation in the window at the gallery which is running 24/7 until October 3rd. It features a fully playable version of Robtron 2084, sermons, and a leaderboard that has pictures of all who attempt to become the mutant savior. Here's a video of it:

The window sensor is a capacitive sensor that was made by Philip Odom. He used the same techniques he taught during the Capacitive Sensing Workshop. Jason Plumb got audio working by using a transducer that turns the window into a speaker. The sign was built by Debbie Wager. Finally, this was all integrated together by the rest of the church.

Come check out the window anytime! Come to our open nights (9/24 & 10/2), check out this post for an idea of what to expect!

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